Garden

Freesia - Freesia

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GeneralitŠ°

perennial herbaceous plant, native to southern Africa; about fifteen botanical species belong to the freesia genus, all of which produce small rounded corms, varying in size between 2-3 centimeters in diameter. Each single bulb produces a small tuft of erect, fairly rigid and fleshy ribbon-like leaves, light green in color; from the center of the leaves in summer a thin erect stem develops, scarcely branched, which bears numerous small trumpet flowers, gathered in arched panicles, very fragrant and white, yellowish or greenish in color. These bulbous plants have been cultivated for many years and there are numerous cultivars, with particularly large flowers or compact habit; the freesias hybrids exist in a wide range of colors, from white to yellow, from pink to blue, from red to orange. Freesia flowers are used in the garden or as cut flowers, but also in the cosmetic industry.


Freesia

Freesia blooms from the middle of spring to the end of summer (depending on the climate) and is famous for its simple beauty, but, more than anything else, for its heady scent (which is, in general, more intense , in yellow or white ones). It is also used a lot as a cut flower because it combines beautifully with other essences. It is declined in a multitude of shades that can cheer up the interior of houses, but also gardens, balconies and window sills.

Freesia is part of the Iridaceae family, and originates in Southern Africa, especially in the Cape of Good Hope area. The bulbs and cut flowers that we find on the market today are the result of repeated hybridizations that have given rise to specimens with larger, more fragrant inflorescences and in a large number of colors.

It is a lively bulbosa. The leaves are deciduous, of a beautiful light green, narrow and long shape, arranged in a fan. The flowers are arranged in bunches at the end of stems initially erect, then arched. The corollas can be found in many colors: yellow, white, orange, red, pink, lilac up to almost blue. They measure from 3 to 5 cm in length, depending on their position within the bunch. There are also cultivars characterized by double flower.

The name freesia was assigned to it by the pharmacist and botanist Ecklon in 1800 to honor Freese, a medical friend of his.

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