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Dipladenia toxic plant

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Question: dipladenia toxicity

Hi I just bought a Dipladenia, I would think of transplanting it into a large pot where there is already the sage, then I discovered that the climber is toxic ... is it possible to use the sage for food? Thanks I hope you take away the doubt.


Dipladenia toxic plant: Answer: dipladenia toxicity

Dear Cristina,

dipladenias (in fact the correct name is mandeville) are climbing plants originating in the American continent; lately for reasons not known to me there is a lot of talk about the toxicity of this plant, which in reality seems to be only slightly toxic, and especially for animals, that if they eat a few leaves they could face episodes of dysentery or vomiting; only that the mandevilla leaves have a bitter-tasting latex, and therefore it is very unlikely that our cat, after a biting rhyming, decides to eat some leaves. In ancient times the mandevilla leaves entered as an ingredient in a particular drink used by the Central American natives, which had psychoactive effects; however, today's research has not found particularly toxic active ingredients in mandevilla plants, and therefore the reason for using the plant in these particular drinks is not clear; perhaps it was added only for the bitter taste, we are not told. We are therefore talking about a plant which, if ingested, can cause undesirable effects; from here not to plant it in a pot with sage the step is much longer than the leg: one thing is to contain (perhaps, probably) some slightly toxic substance in the leaves; another thing is to release these substances into the soil and ensure that they are absorbed by nearby plants. This second event doesn't happen, so don't worry, plant your beauty dipladenia wherever you prefer, and continue to use your sage leaves without any worries. If instead you think it possible that a slightly toxic plant could influence the toxicity of the plant alongside, then move the dipladenia to another pot; however, consider that there are many other toxic plants, perhaps also present on your terrace: hemlock is a very common weed in Italy, it is also often found at the edges of cultivated fields, or among the weeds of gardens, this plant is highly toxic in all its parts, and a few grams of its fruits can lead to death of an adult man following total paralysis of the body; oleanders are decidedly toxic, poisonous plants that we grow in gardens and along the roads, because they are evergreen, robust and have beautiful flowers, all parts of the plant contain a substance that inhibits heart functions, leading to death; the yew (taxus baccata) contains in all its parts a powerful poison, which is also used in some detective novels, as yews are very common and widespread plants, considers that up to a few decades ago it was common practice to eat yew fruits , whose pulp is the only non-toxic part of the plant, while the seeds they contain can be deadly. The question is that a plant, however toxic it may be, does not emit the active ingredients it contains in the leaves or stems directly into the ground, therefore, if we were to plant our salad in the vegetable garden, alongside a plant of hemlock, the nutritional properties of our salad will not be changed in any way by proximity to a highly toxic plant.

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